Patina

My attempt at street photography while traveling up north.  And I file it under:  I don’t really know what it means, but I kind of like how it looks.

Nikon D3, 35mm lens at f3.5, 1/1600th sec., ISO400.

Sailboats at Dusk

Another take from the regatta shoot.  This one shows the sails illuminated by the last light of the day.

Nikon D3, 200-400mm zoom set to 220mm, f4, 1/2500th sec., ISO200.

–Eddie.

Spinnaker in Fading Light

While visiting family in Vermont, I got a chance to photograph a Wednesday night regatta with a long lens I was borrowing from one of my brothers.  The 400mm lens was a blast to work with, since I really love the significant visual compression it lends to scenes.  For this one here, I shot with a very narrow aperture and slow shutter speed, while moving the lens a bit in order to end up with some in-camera motion blur.

Nikon D3, 400mm lens length, 1/5 sec., f14, ISO200.

–Eddie.

New Age Cafe

After photographing all morning, I stopped for coffee at one of my favorite new age cafes in Lake Worth, Florida.

Tech info:

Nikon D3, 35mm lens set to f3.2, 1/800th sec., ISO800.  Exposure set for the background, with the idea that the subjects/objects in front would be partially in silhouette.

Portrait Along the Hiking Trail

Tech info:

Nikon D3, 135mm f2.0 set to f2.2, at 1/8000th sec., ISO200, monochrome mode.  Direct sunlight was coming from the right, so I asked her to turn her face toward the opposite direction in order to avoid unflattering shadows.

Engagement Session

After many years of photographing W, it finally came time to make an engagement portrait for her.  She has always been a positive-feedback-lending subject to photograph, so I was eager to capture her with her fiance, M.

I placed them in a garden alley such that there would be sky light in front of them, with heavy vegetation on both their right and left sides.  Putting them in this tunnel-like lighting scenario served to subtract light coming in from either side, making the main illumination come from front, back and overhead.   A reflector was also placed just underneath them mainly in order to produce catchlights in their eyes, while also adding subtle fill.

For me, once the subjects and I have found our way (through little trials and errors during the session) to a pose that feels and looks comfortable and believable, it’s only a matter of trying to illicit an expression that fits.  I was satisfied with these expressions because they showed happiness without being too effusive.

Tech info:  Nikon D3, 85mm lens, set to f2.5, and 1/1250th sec., ISO 800.  Shot in monochrome mode.

–Eddie.

 

Linds

For this image I experimented with *not* using a reflector, which normally would kick some directional light into the subject’s face.  Shooting within a living room setting, with sliding glass doors in back of her serving as the main source of light in the room, the only light falling back into her face was very diffused, reflected off the various walls and objects in front of her.  I like doing little experiments like this because I learn a little bit more about my own preferences.  And here, I learned that I don’t necessarily like this really diffused lighting scenario.  I’d rather be working with a slightly more directional light — say, from a large white reflector in front of the subject.  For one thing, it was difficult in post processing to balance the light in the background with the light on her face.   Bouncing some light into the face would allow the background to be more correctly exposed, and therefore give me more options regarding how it is rendered in post processing.  It would also add some more modeling (soft shadows) to the face, and produce more attractive catchlights in the eyes.  As it was, the catchlights were a bit faint, so I emphasized them in P/P.

Tech info:

Nikon D3, 85mm lens set to f2.2, at 1/250th sec., ISO800.  Background walls were about 10 feet behind her.

–Eddie.

 

Joe the Pool Guy

As photographers, we never have to go very far to find a photo opportunity because in the normal course of living, we seem to be constantly presented with a steady stream of subjects or scenes to photograph.  Still, it was a few years before I realized that the guy who comes to service my swimming pool could be a willing portrait subject.

Joe usually arrives to do the pool with his hair all tied and tucked under a hat, so it was fun to show him in a more non-work-mode way… in a way that I hadn’t known him before.  A photo shoot is such a great way to find out more about someone, whoever it may be.

For this image, I used the light coming in from a large window with Venetian blinds, with a white reflector on the opposite side to shoot a little fill into shadows.

Tech:  Nikon D3, 85mm f1.8 lens; white wall about 3 feet behind the subject.

–Eddie.

Tracy

Tracy

A little while ago I photographed Tracy for use as model/lifestyle/personal images.  I used an 85mm lens for the entire shoot, mostly at f2.5, but ranging from f2.0 to f4.0.  I don’t really think I’m cut out to be a model photographer, but these types of sessions serve to keep my technique from drifting or degrading between photo jobs, so I’ll continue to take these shoots on when they come about.  More of Tracy’s session here.